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The Aptitude Myth
How an Ancient Belief Came to 
Undermine Children's Learning Today
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by Cornelius N. Grove, Ed.D.
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Published in June 2013 by Rowman & Littlefield
in three formats: hardback, paperback, and e-book.
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The Aptitude Myth may be ordered at Rowman.com
and at the Powells, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon websites.
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For parents, educators, concerned citizens.
?
The book about an ANCIENT belief that
can redirect Americans’ debate about
the FUTURE of their children’s learning.
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For people who are reading The Aptitude Myth

Below are the "What to Remember" lists and the
Genealogical Charts referred to by chapters 1-16.
Newly added: Précis of chapters 17 & 18.

For people who are curious about this book:

Below are a variety of background and
introductory materials, including the
the complete General Introduction.

PART I:  EUROPEAN ANTECEDENTS
When, Why, and How Did Americans' Current Ways of Thinking Originate?
GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO
The Aptitude Myth
Chapter 1:  A Perspective on Teaching Out of the Depths of Time
   What to Remember  [Chapter 1 has no genealogical chart]
Praise from an early childhood educator
Chapter 2:  Greek Philosophers Focus on a World Beyond the Senses
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
From EducationNews.org
An Interview with Cornelius Grove
Chapter 3:  New Views of the Natural World
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
People who liked this sort of thing...
...will find this the sort of thing they like.
Chapter 4:  New Views of Human Consciousness and Learning
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
Back-Cover Description of The Aptitude Myth
Chapter 5:  New Views of Children and Childhood
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
Dedication of The Aptitude Myth
Chapter 6:  New Views of Authority in Society and Schools
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
 Foreword for The Aptitude Myth
Chapter 7:  New Ideals for Human Life and Learning
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
Table of Contents of The Aptitude Myth
Chapter 8:  An Influential Educator Reflects the Currents of His Times
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
Historical Sources for The Aptitude Myth
Chapter 9:  New Views and Ideals All Coalesce in One Man's Mind
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
-One page from the book (2nd page proof)
Chapter 10: Guidelines for the Western-Contemporary Paradigm
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
-Author's full professional bibliography
PART II:  AMERICAN RESPONSES
How Did Americans Apply the European Ways of Thinking, and Why?
-Professional biography on GROVEWELL website
Chapter 11: Evolving Notions of Child-Rearing in Pre-Civil War America
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
-Front Cover of The Aptitude Myth
Chapter 12: Emerging Social Currents in Post-Civil War America
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
-Send an e-mail to author Cornelius N. Grove
Chapter 13: Emerging Intellectual Currents in Post-Civil War America
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
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Chapter 14: Educational Metamorphosis, I: Socially Efficient Education
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
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Chapter 15: Educational Metamorphosis, II: Child-Centered Teaching
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
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Chapter 16: Educational Metamorphosis, III: A "Given" Joins the Establishment
   What to Remember and Genealogical Chart
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PART III:  TOMORROW'S OPPORTUNITIES
Can We Transcend Our Inherited Mindset to Give Mastery the Highest Priority?
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Chapter 17: Which Problems Are Now More Significant to Solve 
Précis of Chapter 17:  Characteristic American beliefs and values about children’s classroom learning are unpacked and elaborated; mastery and effort are missing.  The historical record is reviewed to remind the reader that subject mastery by children was rarely anyone’s undisputed top concern.  The author encourages American parents to shift their values and childrearing activities away from the influence of inherited mythopoetic beliefs about inborn aptitude, and moderately but significantly towards the goal of classroom subject mastery through their child’s own effort and perseverance.
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Chapter 18: Towards a New Paradigm: Seven Assertions to Think With
Précis of Chapter 18:  The author suggests a new paradigm – new concepts and values to think with – that will enable American parents to productively think about our current challenge, the near-total absence of children’s mastery of critical skills and knowledge.  Four of the author's seven transformative paradigm elements are:
   • Accountability for learning rests more with the parents than with the teacher.
   • Accountability for learning rests more with the students than with the teacher.
   • A child’s competence grows more strongly and swiftly with authoritative guidance.
   • Learning attainment is determined far more by perseverance than by “givens.”
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This chapter and the book conclude with the author's recommendation of an outstanding how-to book for parents who want to raise high-achievers: Top of the Class, by Soo & Jane Kim (Berkley, 2006).
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